Tah-Dig (Persian Rice) for #SundaySupper

I can not believe I am already crossing off the first item from my 2013 Culinary Bucket List. Since I started it last year, several bloggers and readers have written to me saying they are now about to start their own list! You have no idea how that makes me feel.

Not only am I doing my own culinary bucket list, but so is the #SundaySupper gang, so I had to jump in and cross things off already.

Tah-Dig (Persian Rice) via LittleFerraroKitchen.com

I have been getting infatuated with other cultures since I really began to dig into cooking and have been researching and scouring new and authentic recipes to create. Tahdig has been on my list for quite a while. It is a Persian style of rice that has a crispy bottom, which is the best part. The word “tahdig” means “bottom of the pot”, which is exactly where the crispy layer is formed. The solid layers bright and golden and I’ve heard it’s supposed to resemble the large and wide golden dessert. It is also said that the better your tahdig is, the more praise and “ooh’s” you receive.

See, this is more of a technique than a recipe. This dish only has 4 ingredients and still creates the most unusual and addictive rice dish you will ever want. Other variations have thinly sliced potato on the bottom as the tahdig, which I can not wait to try next! I’ve also seen a spaghetti tahdig and one with sour cherries too! Read my step by step below to learn how tahdig is made.

Method:

1) In a large bowl, rinse rise several times until the water drains clear.

Tah-Dig (Persian Rice) via LittleFerraroKitchen.com

2) Fill bowl with water again and add a large pinch of salt. Allow rice to soak for about 20 minutes while you boil water.

*Reserve 3 tablespoons of boiling water for later use.

*I’ve read/heard different soaking times, anywhere from no soaking to overnight.

Tah-Dig (Persian Rice) via LittleFerraroKitchen.com

3) Bring a large pot with 4 cups of water to a boil. Drain rice and add to boiling water. Allow to cook, uncovered on medium-high heat for exactly 8 minutes (Set your timer.) Skim the foam off the top.

Tah-Dig (Persian Rice) via LittleFerraroKitchen.com

4) When rice is done, it should begin to puff up, be soft on the outside and hard on the inside. Drain rice and rinse under cold water to stop the cooking.

Tah-Dig (Persian Rice) via LittleFerraroKitchen.com

5) Using a mortar and pestle, grind a large pinch of saffron until it becomes powdery. Dissolve saffron in reserved 3 tablespoons hot water and stir with a spoon. Set aside.

Tah-Dig (Persian Rice) via LittleFerraroKitchen.com

6) Heat a medium size non-stick skillet on medium high heat and add oil, 3 Tb water, turmeric and saffron liquid. Gently swirl pan around so bottom is fully coated.

Tah-Dig (Persian Rice) via LittleFerraroKitchen.com

7) Add rice back into the pan, making sure the entire bottom is covered. Using the back of your large spoon, poke holes into the rice mound being careful not to go all the way down. Allow to cook on medium-high for 10 minutes, you should see steam coming out.

Tah-Dig (Persian Rice) via LittleFerraroKitchen.com

8) Cover pan lid with a kitchen towel and close pan. The towel will catch any moisture from the rice. Allow to cook for another 35 minutes. When it’s done, you should hear a sizzle and crackling sound.
Tah-Dig (Persian Rice) via LittleFerraroKitchen.com

9) To serve: remove lid and place plate on top, carefully inverting the pan so the bottom of the rice is up. Or you can scoop the rice out and break the tahdig apart and scatter around the edges.

Tah-Dig (Persian Rice) for #SundaySupper

Recipe adapted from Turmeric and Saffron and many other Youtube searches

Ingredients

  • 2 cups jasmine rice
  • 1 large pinch of saffron
  • 3 tablespoons canola oil
  • 1 tsp turmeric

Instructions

  1. In a large bowl, rinse rise several times until the water drains clear.
  2. Fill bowl with water again and add a large pinch of salt. Allow rice to soak for about 20 minutes while you boil water. Reserve 3 tablespoons of boiling water for later use. *I've read/heard different soaking times, anywhere from no soaking to overnight.
  3. Bring a large pot with 4 cups of water to a boil. Drain rice and add to boiling water. Allow to cook, uncovered on medium-high heat for exactly 8 minutes (Set your timer.) Skim the foam off the top.
  4. When rice is done, it should begin to puff up, be soft on the outside and hard on the inside. Drain rice and rinse under cold water to stop the cooking.
  5. Using a mortar and pestle, grind a large pinch of saffron until it becomes powdery. Dissolve saffron in reserved 3 tablespoons hot water and stir with a spoon. Set aside.
  6. Heat a medium size non-stick skillet on medium high heat and add oil, 3 Tb plain water, turmeric and saffron liquid. Gently swirl pan around so bottom is fully coated.
  7. Add rice back into the pan, making sure the entire bottom is covered. Using the back of your large spoon, poke holes into the rice mound being careful not to go all the way down. Allow to cook on medium-high for 10 minutes, you should see steam coming out.
  8. Cover pan lid with a kitchen towel and close pan. The towel will catch any moisture from the rice. Allow to cook for another 35 minutes. When it's done, you should hear a sizzle and crackling sound.
  9. To serve: remove lid and place plate on top, carefully inverting the pan so the bottom of the rice is up. Or you can scoop the rice out and break the tahdig apart and scatter around the edges.
http://littleferrarokitchen.com/2013/01/tah-dig-persian-rice-for-sundaysupper/

Tah-Dig (Persian Rice) via LittleFerraroKitchen.com

*Disclaimer: This is a fickle dish. Every oven and stove temperature is different, therefore please play close attention to your rice as it cooks. I used medium-high for creating the crispy rice crust, however if your stove is hotter and you sense it burning, then please lower temperature. Cooking is all about experimenting and variables.

 

This week’s Sunday Supper is all about trying something new, something that’s been on your bucket list that you have yet to tackle.  We have had so much fun with this and can’t wait to share these recipes with you!

Join us this Sunday at 7 pm Eastern Time on Twitter as we share our bucket list recipes during our #SundaySupper chat. 

Sunday Supper Specialty Breads:

Sunday Supper Main Dishes:

Sunday Supper Desserts and Snacks:

Join the #SundaySupper conversation on twitter each Sunday. We tweet throughout the day and share recipes from all over the world. Our weekly chat starts at 7:00 pm ET and you do not want to miss out on the fun. Follow the#SundaySupper hashtag and remember to include it in your tweets to join in the chat. Check out our #SundaySupper Pinterest board for more fabulous recipes and food photos.

Would you like to join the Sunday Supper Movement? It’s easy. You can sign up by clicking here → Sunday Supper Movement.

Comments

  1. says

    oh my gosh oh my gosh oh my gosh – I LOVE this! Chinese people have a word for the crispy rice at the bottom of the pot too. It has always my favourite part to eat. As a kid, I’d pick it off the bottom (only after fighting with my sisters to see who would get the biggest piece) and then dip it into the sauce of whatever dishes we were eating that night. I’ve never heard of tah-dig but I definitely want to make this. Your crust looks so golden and perfect – I can just imagine that satisfying crunch of sinking one’s teeth into it.
    Nancy @ gottagetbaked recently posted..Brioche for a #SundaySupper Bucket ListMy Profile

  2. says

    You have no idea how much this rice was made for me. When I was little I use to ask my mom if I could help clean up after dinner when she made rice. She thought I was being kind but I had an ulterior motive, I wanted to help clean the rice maker and pick off the cripy rice from the bottom of the pan. Until I saw your teaser photo I had no idea there was a dish like this but I can promise you I will be making this very soon. I even have a wonderful stash of saffron.
    Laura | Small Wallet, Big Appetite recently posted..Homemade Falafel #SundaySupperMy Profile

    • SamanthaSamantha says

      Ohhh will you make the Korean style one??! I’ve heard of Tah-dig for a while and a lot of Persians I know grew up on it, so I thought I’d research it and make it. It’s really common in their culture (I’m not Persian) but probably has different flavors, wich saffron and turmeric. I’d LOVE to see the Korean version!

  3. Aliza e says

    I followed the recipe exactly and my rice burned. It was nowhere near 35 min. I think med high heat is too much and it doesn’t need so long. argh. All that time and effort wasted. So frustrated as I was really excited to serve this.

    • SamanthaSamantha says

      Hi Aliza! Well tahdig literally means “bottom of the pot” where the crunchy burnt pieces are..which is the most prized part of it! So is it too burnt at the point of being inedible or is the rice still crispy/burnt? There should be a good crust which is what the higher heat will do. Please try it again and let me know if you have any more questions!

  4. Janie says

    Nice recipe, but as far as I know this is Indian rice not Persian. Persian cooking does not involve a lot of turmeric or saffron. Well at least not in my Persian household.

    • SamanthaSamantha says

      Hi Janie! Thanks for the tip…I have seen other preparations with the saffron and thought the turmeric would be a nice touch as well. I actually did not know that Indian had a similar rice dish!? Would love to look that up!

    • Rox says

      Plenty of Persian dishes requiremturmeric or saffron. This IS a Persian rice dish, however, I might use basmati rice instead of Jasmine next time to be more authentic. But this is not an Indian dish, it is Persian. In fact the Indians I know don’t eat crispy rice and they consider it a mistake when they make accidentally make some on the bottom of their pot of rice,

      • SamanthaSamantha says

        Thank you for your comment Rox! I don’t believe I ever said it was am Indian dish..I do call it “Persian rice” as it is, yes? Please let me know how basmati comes out. I love the flavor of jasmine, that’s why I used it! Happy cooking!

  5. Heather T says

    Just made this tonight after trying a dish like this about a month ago at a nearby Persian restaurant. This was even better than the restaurant. Thanks so much for the step by step instructions and the visuals were very helpful. I’m so happy it turned out so good!!

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